The Latest:

Dr. Art on Corporate Curating and Collecting: The Altoids Curiously Strong Collection

by Matthew Deleget, New York Foundation for the Arts

This is my third and final installment in a special series of articles discussing the process of curating at various types of venues. For this issue, I have chosen to focus on corporate curating and collecting. For quite some time now, I have wanted to profile the unusual and staunchly pro-artist practices of Altoids, The Curiously Strong Mints, and its Curiously Strong Collection, which it began in 1998.

Dr. Art on Dealing with Rejection

by Matthew Deleget, courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

Every time you send off a portfolio of your work to a gallery, curator, grant program, slide registry or other such person or entity, you take the risk of being rejected and disappointed.

http://www2.qsrmagazine.com/articles/exclusives/1209/copyright-1.phtml

Dr. Art on Copyright and Fair Use

by Matthew Deleget, New York Foundation for the Arts

Have you ever heard the classic George Harrison song, “My Sweet Lord”? It goes something like: “I really want to see you / Really want to be with you / Hallelujah / Hare Krishna. . . .” In 1976, United States District Court Judge Richard Owen, arguing that Harrison had heard the song’s melody in someone else’s song long before having written his own, ruled that Harrison was guilty of copyright infringement.

Business of Art: Taxing Artists

Courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

You’re an artist, so you don’t have to worry about some of the constraints that come with running a business. Or do you? Unfortunately, concentrating solely on the process of creating your art is not always possible.

Art Consultants: The Hidden Resource

Courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

What are art consultants, or, as they are sometimes known, art reps or private art dealers? They are essentially people who sell art but who do not have a gallery.

Photo credit: BlackEnterprise

David Sharp: Artists And Finance

Courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

In this column, NYFA Program Officer Edith Meeks interviews performing artists about issues relating to their working careers. Here, she speaks with David Sharp about artists and finance.

Edith Meeks: You’ve made a pretty unusual career combination of dancing and corporate financial consulting. Do you make any connection between the two?

Creating a Budget: How to figure out your real project budget

Courtesy of Creative Capital Foundation

Pay yourself! This is a new concept for some artists, but it's smarter to figure out now what your time is worth, represent this time in your project budget, and raise money based upon these real costs than to underbudget the project and wind up maxing out your credit cards with expensive, last-minute charges and cash advances.

Accounting FAQ

Compiled by Andrea Mills and Steve Barry, Grant Thornton Philadelphia, courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

1. Do I need an accountant?

If you are able to do your bookkeeping and file your tax returns yourself, then you probably do not need an accountant. Once your business becomes more complicated or more time-consuming, then it is probably advisable to hire an accountant and a bookkeeper. It is also advisable to hire a qualified professional such as an accountant or an attorney during the initial setup of your organization. Both professionals will be able to clarify questions and help with the choice of the most appropriate business entity.

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